Indian Wars

Napoleon Henri Daniels

An emigrant train attacked by hostile Indians on the prairie, illustration by Henry Nichols, 1857, Library of Congress.
“An emigrant train attacked by hostile Indians on the prairie”, illustration by Henry Nichols, 1857, Library of Congress.

Napoleon Henri Daniels (1842-1866) was born in in Louisiana, lived in Indiana, and died in the Dakota Territory, yet his name lives on in Maine.

He served in the U.S. Army, 18th Infantry Regiment, during the Civil War, rising from sergeant to major at war’s end. He remained in the Army, serving on the Northwestern Territory where the Army was charged to guard frontier settlements from indigenous people already living there.

On July 20, 1866, on the Bozeman Trail near Fort Phil Kearny in Wyoming, Lieut. Daniels and another soldier rode ahead of the military escort of a small wagon train to find a campsite at Crazy Woman Creek. There the two soldiers were surprised by between 50 and 60 Native warriors. Lieut. Daniels was killed by an arrow through his back. The other lieutenant escaped back to the wagon train, where the battle continued for several hours until a cavalry patrol arrived to end it.

Maine’s Battery Daniels at Fort Leavett, off the coast of Portland, was named in honor of Lieut. Napoleon Daniels.

For more about the battle go to Crazy Woman Creek.

 

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Frederick Henry Beecher

Frederick Henry Beecher from Ancestry.com, posted by IvyOlah39, 2010.

Frederick Henry Beecher (1841-1868), nephew of Harriet Beecher Stowe, enlisted in the 16th Maine after graduating from Bowdoin College in 1862. He was wounded at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, but continued to serve. After the Civil War, Beecher was appointed a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Army, stationed on the Kansas frontier. There he was killed in September of 1868 while on a scouting mission.

For a map of Indigenous People territories in the mid-1800s go to:  Map

 

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