Revolutionary War

Hugh Dunlap

Dunlap, Hugh census 1850, Brunswick, Maine
Hugh Dunlap in the 1850 census for Brunswick, Maine. Ancestry.com.

Hugh Dunlap (1749-1850) was born in 1749 in the town of Brunswick, District of Maine, in Great Britain’s Massachusetts Bay colony. He was the fifth child of Ulster Scot immigrants, Jane (Allison) and her husband, Presbyterian minister Robert Dunlap.

When Dunlap was 26 years old, Brunswick solicited soldiers to fight for American independence. He enlisted with other area men in Capt. Nehemiah Curtis’s company, in Col. Jonathan Mitchell’s regiment. These soldiers were at the unsuccessful 1779 Penobscot Expedition to remove the British from their fort at Castine.

After the war, Dunlap returned to Brunswick where, at the age of 41, he was listed as a farmer in the very first United States census, conducted in 1790. In 1820, when he was 70, Maine broke off from Massachusetts to become a separate state. In 1848, when the horseless carriage chugged down Brunswick’s brand-new railroad tracks, Dunlap was 99 years old.

In 1850, the year Harriet Beecher Stowe’s arrival in Brunswick foreshadowed the Civil War, Hugh Dunlap was still a farmer. The census taker was so impressed with Dunlap’s age of 100 that he wrote the entry in extra-large, bold letters.

When Dunlap died in October that same year, he had lived in Great Britain, the United States of America, Massachusetts, and Maine, even though he had made Brunswick his home for 101 years.

To learn more about Paul Revere’s role in the Penobscot Expedition go to 1779
.

 

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John McManus   (ADOPTED)

The last line above lists Revolutionary War pension payments to Corp. John and Elizabeth McManus from March 1836 to March 1844. Digital image from the National Archives; Washington, D.C., via Ancestry.com.
Image: The last line above lists Revolutionary War pension payments to Corp. John and Elizabeth McManus from March 1836 to March 1844. Digital image from the National Archives; Washington, D.C., via Ancestry.com.

John McManus (1759-1843) was just a young boy when his family emigrated from Ireland to Brunswick, Maine. Just out of his teens, he enlisted in the Continental Army to fight for American independence from Great Britain. He survived the war and lived out his very long life on Rocky Hill in Brunswick.

A death notice published May 17, 1843, in the Brooklyn Eagle described his service:

Brunswick, Maine: John McManus 83y. He served in the army of his country, as a soldier nearly 4 years, was at the surrender of Burgoyne, served under General Sullivan in the Mohawk County, and received a wound at Cherry Valley, which rendered him lame during life.

For stories of other River Road Revolutionary War veterans go to: Rocky Hill Revolution

 

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Francis Heuston 

Image: Francis Heuston tombstone, photo by Barbara A. Desmarais, 2017.
Image: Francis Heuston tombstone, photo by Barbara A. Desmarais, 2017.

Francis Heuston (1765-1858), an African American from Nantucket Island, served on a Revolutionary War armed vessel while still a boy. He settled in Brunswick where he bought a sizeable farm. Heuston, his wife, and their children operated a way station on the Underground Railroad.

Find out more about Francis Heuston and his wife, Mahitable Griffin, at Revealing Hidden Stories.

 

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Danforth brothers, Enoch Jr. and Daniel

Continental Army enlistment poster, Library of Congress
Continental Army enlistment poster, Library of Congress.

Danforth brothers, Enoch Jr. and Daniel, enlisted in the Continental Army in 1776. Both were at the horrific 1778 battle at Cherry Valley, NY, where Enoch Jr. was taken prisoner by British forces. Against all odds, both survived the war and returned to their River Rd. home on Rocky Hill in Brunswick.

For stories of other Rocky Hill Revolutionary War veterans go to: Rocky Hill Revolution.

 

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